AUDRIE & DAISY: A NETFLIX DOCUMENTARY - Key Transitions
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AUDRIE & DAISY: A NETFLIX DOCUMENTARY

AUDRIE & DAISY: A NETFLIX DOCUMENTARY

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Thank you 1recovery.com for the invitation to be a part of this community event.  Key Transitions is honored to be a sponsor for the showing of the Netflix documentary Audrie & Daisy at Santa Monica High School on 11.10.16 at 6pm.  Click here for passes:  https://oneaudrieanddaisysantamonica.eventbrite.com.  This important documentary will raise the awareness of our parents, students and community on the topics of underage drinking, sexual assault, cyber-bullying and suicide. We encourage you to watch the trailer or entire piece on Netflix if you have any concerns about your adolescent viewing. We will be providing a panel of experts for questions immediately following the event as well as community resources in the lobby following the film. We seek to raise awareness of all by showing this powerful work.

  • Click Here to watch the film’s trailer.
  • Click Here to watch the featurette on Tori Amos and the film’s signature song “Flicker.”
  • Panel of Esteemed Mental Health Professionals

Candy Finnigan, Nationally recognized Interventionist, Author of “When Enough is Enough”, Penguin Press and regularly featured on A&E’s Intervention.

Dr. Don Grant, PhD, (un)BOOT CAMP, award-winning Media Psychologist, Chair of the American Psychological Association Committee on Device Management

Dr. Ericha Scott, PhD, LPCC, Internationally Certified Advanced Addiction Counselor, Board Certified Art Therapist, Registered Expressive Arts Therapist, Trauma Specialist

Chris Shumow, Founder of Visions Adolescent Treatment Centers and SAMOHI Alumni. Chris has set the standard for adolescent treatment amongst industry professionals.

  • Words from the filmmakers:

    In towns on different sides of America, two teenage girls pass out while intoxicated at high school parties and, while unconscious, both are sexually assaulted by boys they call friends. In the aftermath the girls each endure online harassment, both attempt suicide, and tragically, one dies. The film explores this new public square of shame from the perspective of the teenagers and their families — including the boys involved in the assaults and the girls willing to speak out publicly. The film is rated PG-13.

     

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